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Year XII (2018), issue 19

Literature and Science Fiction

Current issue in pdf

19

Contents

Kevin Alexander Boon, Epistemology of Science Fiction (transl. from English by Ruzha Muskurova)

Neil Gerlach and Sheryl N. Hamilton, Introduction: History of Social Science Fiction (transl. from English by Ruzha Muskurova)

Jutta Weldes, Globalization is Science Fiction (transl. from English by Ruzha Muskurova)

Fredrik Jameson, The End of Temporality (transl. from English by Ruzha Muskurova)

Evgeniya Kantchura, Fantasy: Renewing the View of the World and the Way to Yourself (transl. from Ukrainian by Albena Stamenova)

Miglena Nikolchina, Will You Stay Here? The Artificial Creature from Kleist to Garland

Yanitsa Radeva, "Solaris": Between Novel and Screen and the Role of the Book in Another World

Vladimir Pleganov, Science Fiction Author and Death: The Short Stories by James Tiptree Jr.

Penka Vatova, About the First Robot in Bulgarian Literature and Other Inventions of Georgi Iliev from the 30s of the 20th Century

Nadezhda Stoyanova, The Inventor and „the Charm of the Moon"

Elena Borisova, The Tragedy of Human Alienation: Nataliya Andreeva, Nikolay Vatov and Pavel Vezhinov

Rositsa Chernokozheva, For Children's Spontaneity and Creativity on Earth and in the Cosmos. The Fantastic Lyuben Dilov’s Novel for Children

 

Debut

Kostantin Adirkov, The Opera „Don Giovanni” of Mozart and Da Ponte in View of its Place among the Literary Interpretations of the Theme (emphasis on Da Ponte's libretto)

 

Reviews

Noemi Stoichkova, "Literary History II" by Milena Kirova

Svetlana Stoycheva, On an Academic Reading of the Literary Reading of Migration

Ventsislav Sholtse - Stories and Aporiеs of Literary Criticism. "Critical Languages and Ideological Fields: Fragments of a Century, 1878-1989" by Noemi Stoichkova

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Epistemology of Science Fiction

Kevin Boon

Pennsylvania State University, US

The author outlines three ages in the development of science fi ction – early

age, modern age and postnuclear age. Because science fi ction manifests

the structure of empirical knowledge at a particular time within a culture,

it functions as a reaction to and a barometer for cultural shifts in the way

meaning is structured. Thus, by examining the epistemes of western

culture, Kevin Boon exposes thematic transformations in science fi ction

and vice versa.

 
Introduction: History of Social Science Fiction

Neil Gerlach and Sheryl N. Hamilton

Carleton University, Canada

The intellectual encounter between the social sciences and science fi ction

has been rich and varied. This Introduction examines how sf literature,

sf criticism, and social science theory and practice have intersected and

infl uenced each other. We suggest a four-part typology, analyzing how

the social sciences have employed sf, how sf has dealt with the social,

how sf criticism has addressed social theory, and how science fi ction has

itself emerged as a social science methodology. The interdisciplinary

conversation between the social sciences and sf literature and criticism

recognizes the deep imbrication of science fi ction thinking in late modernity

and offers valuable theoretical and methodological resources for opening

up important social questions.

 

Globalization is Science Fiction

Jutta Weldes

University of Bristol, England

Jutta Weldes claims that by examining the relations between the discourses

of globalisation and science fi ction, we can begin to understand how

globalisation is made meaningful. She exposes the liberal globalisation

discourse as fantasy and examines its most important elements: a narrative

of progress; the central and wholesome role of global markets; an utopian

narrative of technological advance; the trope of the ‘global village’; the

interrelated narratives of an increasingly global culture and its inclination

to fundamentally authoritarian politics. The author highlights some of the

homologies between the globalisation discourse and the discursive universe

of Isaac Asimov’s Foundation novels.

 

 

The End of Temporality

Fredrik Jameson

Duke University, US

The author states that the moderns were obsessed with the secret of time,

and the postmoderns with that of space. He thinks that even if such a shift

from a temporal to a spatial dominant be acknowledged, it would seem

momentous enough to demand further explanation. The contemporary

situation has been characterized as a dramatic and alarming shrinkage of

existential time and the reduction to a present that hardly qualifies as such

any longer, given the virtual effacement of that past and future that can

alone defi ne a present in the fi rst place. He claims that a reduction to the

present and to the body is to be seen as a structural effect of the temporality

of our socioeconomic system or, in other words, of postmodernity as such,

of late capitalism. It is the system that generates a specifi c temporality

and that then expresses that temporality through the cultural forms and

symptoms.

 

Fantasy: Renewing the View of the World and the Way to Yourself

Evgeniya Kantchura

Zhytomyr State Technological University, Ukraine

The paper reviews readers‘ reception of fantasy literature, demonstrates

the reasons of its popularity, and outlines the origins of this literary mode.

Fantasy defamiliarization – the main feature of the meta-genre – provides

with a fresh worldview and opens the way of individuation for a story

character as well as for a reader. Fantasy literature enriches imagination,

sharpens critical thinking, expands mental horizons of young readers, and

develops their emotional maturity.

Key words: fantasy, meta-genre, imagination, defamiliarization, mythopoetics,

individualization, Self and The Other, retreat from anthropocentrism,

ecological thinking.

 

Will You Stay Here? The Artificial Creature from Kleist to Garland

Miglena Nikolchina

Sofia University, Bulgaria

The article traces the intertextual connections between Alex Garland’s fi lm

Ex Machina and some of his eminent literary predecessors with a special

emphasis on Hoffmann’s “The Sandman,” Auguste Villiers de L’Isle-

Adam’s The Future Eve, and Stanislaw Lem’s “The Mask.” While tales of

robots tend as a rule to provide refl ection on the scientifi c preoccupations

and the artistic trends of their own epoch, they also as a rule address and

question various philosophical concepts of the human. These concerns

frequently coalesce in a story of “love with an automaton,” to which

Garland’s fi lm adds a remarkable innovative twist.

Key words: Robot, human, love with an automaton, artifi cial intelligence,

automatism, freedom

 

„Solaris“: Between Novel and Screen and the Role of the Book in Another World

Yanitsa Radeva

Sofia University, Bulgaria

This article analyzes Solaris (1961) by Stanislav Lem (Stanisław Lem), with

them ovies by Boris Nirenburg (1968), Andrey Tarkovsky (1972) and Steven

Soderbergh (2002). The author searches the relationships – a man and a

book, a man and a God, a man and a space and the real place of the man in

the cosmos.

Key words: Stanislav Lem, man, book, God

 

Science Fiction Author and Death: The Short Stories by James Tiptree Jr.

Vladimir Poleganov

Sofia University, Bulgaria

The article attempts to outline and analyze the occurrences and

transformations of the theme of death in the short stories of James Tiptree

Jr. One of science fi ction most interesting writers, James Tiptree Jr.’s work

is known for its original treatment of topics such as desire, sexuality, and

ecology. The current text argues, on one hand, that all of these are in some

way connected to and leading to the major theme in the writer’s oeuvre –

death, and on the other, that death in a James Tiptree Jr. story is not just “the

end”, but a new transformative and concept-producing space.

Key words: James Tiptree Jr., Alice Sheldon, science fi ction, the fantastic,

the future, feminism, death, sexuality, ecology, desire

 

About the First Robot in Bulgarian Literature and Other Inventions of Georgi Iliev from the 30s of the 20th Century

Penka Vatova

Institute for Literature – BAS, Bulgaria

The text is focused on the parameters that introduce into the literary

narrative, the technical inventions of early Bulgarian science fi ction – in

particular the robot, ray beams and weapons. Observations are mainly

based on the novels of George Iliev, O-Corse (1930) and Teuth’s Rebellion

(1933), but they are open to parallels with other works and authors of

the same time period. The aim is to highlight the literary aspects of the

inventions and their relation to reality, to man and to humanity.

Key words: Bulgarian science fiction, George Iliev, robot, ray beams

 

The Inventor and „The Charm of the Moon“

Nadezhda Stoyanova

Sofia University, Bulgaria

The article is focused on the inventor as a literary character of Bulgarian

interwar literature. In the fi rst part of the research an attempt for a typology

of the character is made. In the second part is studied the image of the

Moon in the short story by Svetoslav Minkov “Lunatin!...Lunatin!...

Lunatin!..” (1932). This image turns out to be a reason to study the literary

and ideological shaping of the inventor as a literary character set in the

context of the mass discourse about the scientifi c progress of the 1930s.

Key words: inventor, moon, Svetoslav Minkov, science fiction

 

The Tragedy of Human Alienation: Nataliya Andreeva, Nikolay Vatov and Pavel Vezhinov

Elena Borisova

Institute for Literature – BAS, Sofia, Bulgaria

In the very center of interpretation of the recent text is tragedy of alienation,

developed in works of Pavel Vezhinov, Natalia Andreeva and Nikolay

Vatov. Alienation as a condition and result of the development of human

civilization provokes extreme psychological condition in the characters,

disruption between real and imaginary. The radicalization of the mental

states and desires of characters evokes by the “difference”, connected with

their birth. The impossibility of “alienated mind” and its existence in a

world that suppresses “different spirits”, leads to crash to explore and get

to know of realistic spaces that the only way to understand their totality is

fi nal separation between mind and body through death.

Key words: real, imaginary.alienated mind, different spirits

 

For Children‘s Spontaneity and Creativity on Earth and in the Cosmos. The Fantastic Lyuben Dilov’s Novel for Children

Rositsa Chernokozheva

Institute for Literature – BAS, Bulgaria

The article examines the science fi ction novel for children “The Space

Adventures of Numi and Niki” by LiubenDilov, with the subtitle “Sci-fi

novel for children and similar to them creatures”, through the prism of

the child’s spontaneity and creativity. On the forefront are brought the

existential truths, which the heroes reach to, in their space adventures. The

accent is on the tolerance for the other’s believes, differences and empathy

for his feelings. Through the humor and the language of Aesop, the author

questions many habits and ways of our socialist reality during that time,

through the idea for a humane, ethical and esthetic tendency.

Key words: Liuben Dilov, novel for children, socialist reality

 

The Opera „Don Giovanni” of Mozart and Da Ponte in View of its Place among the Literary Interpretations of the Theme (emphasis on Da Ponte‘s libretto)

Kostantin Adirkov

Sofia University, Bulgaria

The present work aims to position the opera „Don Giovanni“ by Wolfgang

Amadeus Mozart and Lorenzo Da Ponte among the literary and not only

interpretations of Don Juan written until the beginning of the 19th century.

For this purpose will be made a brief overview of the previous literary

works on the subject. After that will be presented a more detailed analysis

of the opera‘s libretto, which aims to present the latter as one of the most

brilliant interpretations of Don Juan.

Key words: Don Juan, literary characters, literary transformations